Architectures for Emergencies

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Among the different mean of “emergency” we have chosen to focus particularly on the post-crisis reconstruction, including both natural and man-made disasters: earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, pollution, global climate change, post-war reconstructions, to those who everyday deal with an armed conflict.

English edition.

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Among the different mean of “emergency” we have chosen to focus particularly on the post-crisis reconstruction, including both natural and man-made disasters: earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, pollution, global climate change, post-war reconstructions, to those who everyday deal with an armed conflict.
To face an emergency means to deal with problems of the most different natures, some requires immediateness, others longer subsidence times. Sometimes it is matter of providing housing to those who have lost theirs – in the following pages we will try to explore the debate between temporary and permanent shelters –, other times it is matter of safeguarding human dignity, without forgetting the importance of the memory of places.

Even if they are considered as special events – something rarely happening – emergencies are, in many cases, an everyday reality: from natural to man-made disasters, and architecture must face a broad variety of emergency circumstances.
Can we speak about “architecture” at a given historical moment or in certain geographic areas? Which is the role, what can we expect and what reliability could be placed in architecture in specific contexts? How do architects react to situations like: destruction – physical and/or of the memory –, presence of ruins, restoration and reconstruction, and how does all that interacts with human perception of the environment?

With contributions from: Wang Lu, Make It Right, MVRDV, Deborah Gans, Koji Tsutsui, ARCò, Daniel Libeskind, David Sanderson, Pasquale Zaffina, O. Compagnon – P. Tebben, Nora Niasari, Laura Marino, Marta Niccolai, René Mancilla, A. Fernández – S. Ortega, Denis Oudendijk + Jan Körbes, Jean Prouvé, Renzo Piano, Alvaro Siza.

Boundaries is a quarterly magazine on sustainable, socially engaged and humanitarian architecture. Each issue is monographic, with full texts in English and Italian (facing), and all articles are accompanied by notes and a bibliography for further reading. ISSN 2239-0332.

Grade 
01/27/2015

Très bien!

Arrivée très rapide, avec une attention particulière pour chaque commande. très bien, livre en parfait état et très intéressant.

Grade 
05/03/2014

Different !

Unlike many architecture publications put out a few or more times a year, Boundaries gives each issue a theme and strictly makes the content fit the topic. The first issue (July-September 2011), for example, is called "Contemporary Architecture in Africa" and does an excellent in job in presenting buildings, projects, books, and histories on the continent. Each issue is structured into sections: News, Perspective, Architecture, Ideas, That Was the Year..., and Book Reviews. The Architecture section makes up the bulk of each issue and highlights particular types of buildings or related strands within the theme. In this regard, issue 2 -- "Architecture for Emergencies" -- collects buildings but also monuments, theories/research, and reporting around the timely and complex theme. That Was the Year is a great part of the magazine, as it features flashbacks usually decades back (a reprinted article or some such piece) that of course fit the issue's theme: Aldo van Eyck's 1959 essay on the Dogon is one found in the first issue, and Jean Prouve's 1956 "House Built in Less Than Seven Hours" is one of the old projects highlighted in the second issue.

These first two themes make it clear that Boundaries is not concerned with the same issues as other architecture magazines; the editors prefer to focus on the under-served and the places of crisis today. This is evident not only in the themes but in the projects included in each issue (only the ultra-modern houses in "Contemporary Architecture in Africa" stand out...as designs that would probably be in other magazines but don't really belong in this one) and the position that "Boundaries receives no public funding, and has no advertising." The only "ads" to be found are for the Italian Red Cross and other emergency organizations. This makes me hope the magazine gains enough following to continue its exploration of architecture that is timely and relevant but often overshadowed by the usual big names and commissions that value form over social concerns. Boundaries may not be as photogenic as other magazines, owing to its dealing with the "social awareness of the profession," but it makes up for that small defect (for lack of a better word) in its thorough coverage on a topic, varied viewpoints on the same, and a strong sense of history that makes one realize our problems are not new and neither may be the solutions.

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Architectures for Emergencies

Architectures for Emergencies

Among the different mean of “emergency” we have chosen to focus particularly on the post-crisis reconstruction, including both natural and man-made disasters: earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, pollution, global climate change, post-war reconstructions, to those who everyday deal with an armed conflict.

English edition.

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